Liquid Gold: Beautiful Nut Oils

Nut OilsColorful bottles of nut oils lined up on a store shelf make us want to go home and cook.  Open the top and the essence of the nut is with you, as if you have cracked open a shell.  But cooking with nut oils is not the same as cooking with the nuts and seeds themselves.  Here is why:

Nut oils are fragrant delicate liquids that don’t hold up to much heat.  We prefer the ones that are labelled cold pressed, because they have been created with care.  When heat is added to the oil production process it denigrates the inherent flavors a tiny bit.  Cold pressing extracts just the fats without heat harming the oil, and it’s name ” cold pressed” is as descriptive as can be.  When people first gathered nuts and seeds to eat they soon learned that crushing them would release their oils, creating another useful product from the wonders around them.  Now nut and seed oils are made in industrial settings with big steel rollers doing the work, no longer crushed between 2 stones as in times long ago.  It may be quicker and therefore less expensive to apply heat, but cold pressed oils have flavors that are the essences of the nuts, truer and brighter than the warmed commercial alternatives.

The best use of most nut oils is in finishing a recipe, when no further heat is applied.  We drizzle them on top of soups about to be served or whisk them in to salad dressings.  A little goes a long way, their flavors are intense.  We buy them in the smallest possible quantities because their shelf lives are limited, and we don’t want to waste a drop by spoilage.  Keep them closed, cool and dry, and once opened, inside the refrigerator is the place to store them.  We pair the flavor of oil with the same nut when we can.  The oil elevates the nut’s inherent flavor, underscoring it’s best fragrant qualities.

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