More Than Waffles

Hazelnut Waffle DemoI pulled in to in the supermarket lot, parked, and swung over to the long line of shopping carts.  Flipping down an infant seat, and dropping in my overfilled shabby bag, the ad at the far end of the cart caught my eye.  Nutella topping a waffle.  A few berries scattered artfully on top.  And it was only yesterday that we were making hazelnut sour cream waffles with a schmear of homemade chocolate hazelnut goodness, spreading the love at a cooking demonstration designed to introduce and promote our book, In A Nutshell: Cooking and Baking with Nuts and Seeds.

Homemade Nutella is a snap to make, deceptively easy.  Just whiz 5 ingredients (Dutch process cocoa, confectioner’s sugar, chopped hazelnuts, vanilla extract and canola oil) together in a food processor or a Vita Mix blender, as we did in our demo. It keeps for a week or even longer tightly closed in the refrigerator.  The flavor is massive in comparison to the commercial stuff.  Sandy in texture, dark in color and deeply rich in flavor, we love to eat it many ways.  The two best ways come quickly to mind.  First is licked right off of a spoon.  Next is how we prepared it at the demo, same as the advertisement I spied in the supermarket cart: spread on a piping hot waffle.

We made waffles of substance to pair with the spread.  The Hazelnut Sour Cream waffles are both dense and crunchy.  Made in a Belgian waffle maker, they have deep cavities that are easily filled to their brims with the spread. Both hazelnut flour and chopped pieces of hazelnut keep the texture just right: light yet firm with a little golden crust on the outside. The combo is Hazelnut Heaven.  We hope for the day that many folks exchange their trips to the frozen food isle with dusting off their waffle irons and whirring up their blenders.  Our Hazelnut Sour Cream waffles with homemade chocolate hazelnut spread make an easy to prepare breakfast or snack that outshines the commercial combination in every way.

 

 

 

California Here I Come

I’m in San Diego giving a book talk.  The Jewish Community Center  of La Jolla has invited me to speak at their Succoth festivities, and at this time of year it seems like the perfect spot to celebrate nature’s mother lode of nuts and seeds.  The Jewish holiday of Succoth is time to acknowledge a bountiful harvest.  An open lattice of boughs and fruits top a temporary wooden structure that observant Jews erect in their backyards, balconies, or even on their fire escapes as my father did when a child in 1920’s New York.  The open nature of the “roof” allows all those who eat in the Succah, as is customary, to look up at the stars, and contemplate the passing of another year on the Jewish calendar. It is a symbolic, ethereal structure that underscores the nomadic history of the Jewish people.  And as nomads, the ancient Jews of the Middle East would surely have scooped up the fallen bounty of almonds, sesame seeds and whatever other morsels they found as they wandered through the desert.  Before cultivation and the rise of settled agriculture, Jews gathered what was plentiful, and as their culture and cuisine evolved, integrated these resources into their daily sustenance.

almond spreadI’m delighted to celebrate in a San Diego Succah. I’ll be demonstrating our chocolate hazelnut spread from the book,made with almonds instead of hazelnuts. The group chose to use almonds because they are a local and plentiful California resource, a sentiment that resounds with the spirit of the holiday.  We will spread it on the fruits of the season and enjoy. I will look up at the sky, and be grateful for another bountiful year.